Artificial Intelligence Příbor | Graduated from the gymnasium iRADIO

High school graduates in Příbora in Novojičín were replaced by artificial intelligence on Friday. The authors tested how it would fare in front of a group and what knowledge and connections the computer could learn on its own. There were three subjects. For example, history.




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Artificial Intelligence also tries its luck at Matriculation Board this year (illustrative photo) | Source: Shutterstock

“The Kosice government plan is a plan for the post-war period and the future direction of Czechoslovakia,” states the facts on the artificial intelligence matriculation exam. Knowledge of post-war development in Czechoslovakia was second to none, the computer’s response to the darkest periods of history. And he should mention.


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“Your answer is very general. Can you elaborate and give some specific examples?” asks one of the examiners. “Specific examples of savagery, for example, the massacre of Swedish prospects near Přerov,” the computer replies.

Another subject is Physics. Authors do not give and want accurate data. “You’re right, I forgot to mention the specific height,” apologizes the machine. The whole thing is actually a modified software already in common use, an artificial intelligence that automatically learns everything according to matriculation questions. According to him, the difference between life and synthetic high school graduate is even bigger.

“If I overstate it, it’s a very intelligent autocompletion, that is, word completion. They don’t think like humans. A student can come up with something, but the computer only depends on the data it’s trained on and can’t learn anything yet,” explained Denis Valacek, the author of the experiment.

Then detailed questions about Czech and Jiri Volker, analysis of verses, poetic meanings. There, the computer struggled a bit. “Poetry is something I also need a lot. Understanding and understanding the text is the most difficult thing,” said author Peter Galon, another of the experiment’s organizers.

“Czech language and literature followed – admirably, as the matriculation committee voted, one in Czech. Although it sounded like the real thing, teachers at high school graduations asked something from artificial intelligence they don’t normally hear at high school graduations: “The best question.”

Martin Niddle, so called

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